A profusion of Garamonds

During the first few centuries after the invention of moveable type, typefaces were rarely referred to by any other name except their style – one bought "roman" or "italic" from this or that foundry, which sold only fonts for body type. With the explosion of print production in the 19th century, however, and an increasingly rich trove of historical fonts from which to choose, foundries began producing quantities of new fonts with a variety of names. Some of them borrowed the surnames of prestigious punch-cutters. In the 20th century, as rediscoveries and interpretations of typefaces increased, the profusion of "Garamonds" led foundries wishing to stand out to use the names of Garamont's colleagues:

Foundries produce quantities of fonts named “Garamond”.

AIn the 20th century, as rediscoveries and interpretations of typefaces increased, the profusion of "Garamonds" led foundries wishing to stand out to use the names of Garamont's colleagues: Robert Granjon and later Jacques Sabon and Antoine Augereau. Paradoxically, these typefaces – freed from the eclectic historicism of the 19th century – were closer to the original model than the early 20th-century "Garamonds", with the exception of the one produced by the Stempel foundry. The name of Christophe Plantin, a 16th-century Antwerp-based printer who used Garamont's typefaces, was also borrowed for several typefaces. The thick and somewhat ungainly Plantin produced by the Fonderie Typographique Française (FTF) was not wildly successful. On the other hand, the Monotype Plantin designed by Franck Hinman Pierpont in 1913, remains one of the most frequently-used typefaces for body type (in its digital form, of course). Plantin's typefaces were also the source of inspiration for Stanley Morison and Victor Lardent's celebrated Times New Roman (1931).

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